Trending February 2024 # Cmv: Macs And Ipads Will Remain Separate Product Lines For Many Years Yet # Suggested March 2024 # Top 6 Popular

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When Apple this week confirmed plans to bring iOS apps to the Mac, it answered the question about whether it would merge iOS and macOS with a huge ‘No’ on the screen. Some have responded by suggesting that may be true now, but this is just the first step.

I wrote an op-ed way back in 2013 asking the question whether Apple was headed toward eventual convergence of the two platforms, and concluding that it wasn’t going to happen for a very long time.

My conclusion hasn’t changed since then. Indeed, moves in that direction have been even slower than I suspected – I expected much more visual similarity between the two operating systems by now.

More recently, I wondered whether Apple’s plans for cross-platform apps might result in the dumbing down of Mac apps. I’ve taken much reassurance from what Apple has since said about UIKit. The bottom-line message is that the two platforms will remain separate, and that only those iOS apps which make sense on Mac would be ported.

Why the laptop form-factor is safe for a very long time

The first laptop I ever used was the Tandy TRS-80 Model 100, in 1983. There were a few others with the same form-factor – a flat unit with a small grey-scale LCD screen above a full-size keyboard – but by the following year it had been superseded by the Model 200.

That clamshell design was established by 1984. And, in essence, it has remained unchanged since then. Sure, today’s laptops are far slimmer and massively more capable, but that ‘screen hinging back over keyboard’ form factor has remained in use for 34 years and counting.

That’s not coincidence. There are thousands of industrial designers who would love nothing more than to create a new, better form-factor. The reason that none of them have is because that now-elderly design still works today.

Even Apple has only tweaked things. The first Macintosh Portable had a trackball to the right of the keyboard. The Powerbook models moved it below the keyboard before later replacing it with a trackpad. Since then, it’s really been a process of refinement.

Even the current-gen MacBook Pro uses exactly the same form-factor as those early PowerBooks. It’s way slimmer and lighter, of course. The trackpad has got much bigger and smarter. The keyboard has become (controversially!) sleeker. And we got the Touch Bar, which, in all honesty, you could take away from me tomorrow and I wouldn’t really miss it. But, in essence, it’s the same core design.

So the MacBook form factor isn’t going anywhere because the laptop design Just Works.

But what about the Surface?

I said no-one has reinvented the laptop form factor, but what about the Surface? Doesn’t that prove me wrong?

When I first saw a photo of the Microsoft Surface, I absolutely loved the concept. There are times when I want a laptop, and there are other times when I want a tablet, and the idea of having both devices in one is extremely appealing.

In theory. The problem with the Surface is that it’s a somewhat compromised laptop, and an absolutely terrible tablet.

The screen unit is massively too heavy for comfortable use as a tablet. My partner has one as her work laptop. As a laptop, she loves it. By laptop standards, it’s lightweight, and it’s quick to wake and boot. In theory, she likes that it can be a tablet too. In practice, she has a separate one of those: an iPad Pro.

And different form factors mean different interfaces – as Microsoft learned the hard way. A UI designed for use with a trackpad is horrible to use with a finger, and one designed for use with a touchscreen is annoyingly basic when you have the precision of a trackpad available to you.

If the Surface were a better laptop, then all laptops would look and work like that by now. In reality, hardly any do.

That isn’t going to change anytime soon

For a laptop, I want a minimum of a 15-inch screen. (Really, I want a bigger one, but I’ve given up all hope of that for now.)

But a 15-inch tablet – even one as sleek and light as an iPad – is no replacement for 9.7-inch or 10.5-inch iPad.

You may remember that I tried out the 12.9-inch iPad. I loved it. The screen was fantastically immersive.

Anything involving photo or video is fantastic. Netflix addicts will love it. The screen a great size for personal viewing – and for two at a push […]

I absolutely love how good photos look on this screen. The size means that showing someone a photo on this is exactly like handing them a 10×8 print in the old days – you feel like they’re seeing it properly […]

A4/US letter documents may not have the wow factor of photos, but it’s terrific to be able to view them at almost full size. No scrolling, no zooming, just comfortably read an entire page at a time.

But, in the end, I sent it back – because it couldn’t replace my existing iPad. It was too big to carry around casually, and it was too heavy for use as an ebook in bed (a core use for my iPad). And that was a 12.9-inch iPad – a 15-inch version would be out of the question.

One counter-argument is that, over time, technology gets slimmer and lighter. A 15-inch iPad may be too heavy to contemplate today, but one day it will be as light as today’s 10.5-inch one, right?

Well, eventually, sure. But if you look at the trend-line, that isn’t going to happen anytime within the next few years.

You also need to consider things like thermal throttling. One of the laws of physics is that the larger the surface area, the more heat you can disperse, and the longer you can go before you need to start throttling back the performance of the device. A clamshell design gives you a large surface from which to radiate heat; a tablet design, a far smaller one.

Again, that will improve over time, but again the pace of development there is not dramatic.

So yep, I’m not going to say never because, as the old saying has it, never is a pretty long time. But I will predict that there’s zero chance of it happening within five years, and personally I doubt it will happen within ten. Even with the very modest first step Apple is taking in this direction won’t be available to developers until next year. These are baby steps.

Change My View

So that’s my view. The laptop form factor hasn’t been replaced in more than three decades, despite attempts by Microsoft and others.

Laptop and tablet designs have very different pros & cons, and that isn’t going to change for the foreseeable future. I could see a touchscreen on a MacBook being useful some of the time, and I’m not philosophically opposed to adding one, so long as the UI is primarily designed for trackpad use.

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New Windows Build Will Use Separate Process For Folders By Default

Have you ever had a folder go unresponsive and then when you close it, you notice your entire desktop disappeared in the process? It can be a very frustrating occurrence, but Microsoft is aiming to tackle that. A future update to Windows 10 will enable an independent process for folders by default. This should, in turn, reduce the impact folders have when they crash.

What Does this Mean?

When you open a folder in the current version of Windows, it doesn’t have an independence from the rest of the OS. It’s buried within a process called chúng tôi which takes care of all your folder needs. The problem with this is that Explorer also handles a lot of other things as well, such as the toolbar and desktop.

If you’re doing something within a folder and the folder crashes, this hang-up causes the entire chúng tôi process to crash alongside it. This also takes out everything else that Explorer is currently running, meaning one folder’s hiccup can take out a lot more than just its contents!

How Does a Separate Process Solve This?

By making the folders open in an independent process, it keeps things a little more self-contained. Folders are no longer a core part of Explorer – it’s now a branch in its own right. In the same way, if a folder goes unresponsive, it doesn’t affect the rest of Explorer; just that one “branch” dedicated to folders.

Separation like this is a good way to keep the operating system more stable overall. By giving things their own process, it helps contain any problems that arise within it. The more features that are crammed within a process, the more functionality `suffers when one of those features goes awry.

Does Each Folder Get a Process?

Unfortunately, no! What this update does is simply bundle all the folders under one process. That does mean that if one folder crashes, all the others will fall with it; you will notice, however, that the rest of Explorer will keep running despite the process falling over. While not a perfect solution, this is a nice step toward making Windows 10 more stable.

Can You Activate It Now?

Yes! While this upcoming update will activate this feature by default, it doesn’t mean it isn’t already on your operating system. If you don’t want to wait for the update to activate it for you, you can turn on the separate folder process right now and enjoy a more stable Explorer.

Find the checkbox called “Launch folder windows in a separate process” and tick it.

In the Process of Improving Processes

With folders currently running off the main Explorer branch, it means any instability with them takes out more than just your open folders! The latest update, however, will enable a separate folder process by default. If you don’t want to wait, you can always enable it manually instead.

Have you crashed Explorer often? If so, do you think a separate folder process will help? Let us know below.

Simon Batt

Simon Batt is a Computer Science graduate with a passion for cybersecurity.

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Product Portfolio Classification And Analysis

What is a Product Portfolio?

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Product Portfolio Classification

One of the most popularly used classifications of the product portfolio is the BCG growth-market share matrix developed by Boston Consulting Group’sthen CEO and Founder, Mr. Bruce Doolin Henderson, in the 1970s. The BCG matrix consists of two axes –the X-axis representing the relative market share and the Y-axis representing the expected market growth rate.

Based on the two axes, the entire matrix divide into four quadrants, where each represents a particular stage of the product in its life cycle. The four quadrants are – Cash cows, Stars, Question marks, and Dogs.

Cash Cows: This quadrant represents those products that enjoy a high market share in a slowly growing market. The products in this category can generate maximum revenue because of their high market share in a market that is not growing. As such, the Cash cow products require the least amount of investment while it has the potential to give higher returns, which helps enhance the company’s overall profitability.

Stars: This quadrant represents products with a low market share in a high growth rate market. As such, an organization faces steep competition for the products in this segment, and thus it can’t afford to be complacent even when it is among the top few. However, if the organization can plan properly, Star products can potentially become Cash cows in the longer term.

Question Marks: This quadrant represents those products that may have a high market share in a market that is growing fast. However, it is not sure whether the market for the product will go up or down in the future. If the product loses customer attention, it won’t be able to gain market share, the growth rate will fall, and the product will eventually become a Dog. On the other hand, if the product can grab more customer interest to gain a higher market share, it can become a Cash cow. This uncertainty results in the dilemma of investing more money into it. An organization is unsure if the investment will give adequate returns or become a waste of money.

Product Portfolio Analysis

For instance, for Apple Inc., the iPhone is the most profitable segment and mostly drives the company’s top-line. Hence, the iPhone segment can categorize as the company’s Star product. On the other hand, the MacBook and the iPad can categorize as Cash cows.

How to Manage a Product Portfolio?

Product portfolio management is an important part of any business strategy as it helps achieve the organization’s overall objectives by planning future tactics for different product lines. Below, we discuss some of the strategy for the above-mentioned product categories:

Cash Cows: Companies intend to retain their market share for this segment as it isn’t growing much. They introduce customer loyalty programs and similar promotions to ensure high customer retention.

Question Marks: For this segment, the best strategy is to acquire new customers so that the question marks can be converted to the stars or the cash cows. Also, it is important to monitor the market to understand consumer psychology, which can be used to enhance the market share for the products in this category.

Dogs: For this segment, the companies may need to take the hard decision of divestment. Otherwise, they can also revamp the products in this category through rebranding, innovation, etc. Nevertheless, converting the Dogs into Stars or Cash cows is difficult.

Key Takeaways

The product portfolio is the ensemble of a company’s product offerings, which can break down into different product categories, product lines, or simply individual products.

Based on the relative market share and the expected market growth rate, a company’s product offerings can be divided into four categories – Cash cows, Stars, Question marks, and Dogs.

Product portfolio analysis and management help a company achieve its increased sales and profits objectives.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Product Portfolio. Here we also discuss the introduction and how to manage a product portfolio. Along with key takeaways. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

Tune In Oct. 22 For New Ipads, Mac Pro Details, Macbook Pros, And Mavericks

Apple’s next event is upon us, and it’s likely to be action-packed. As Apple says: it has “a lot to cover.” So besides the speculation that rings in from the word cover (new Smart Covers, anyone?), Apple has some new tablets, computers, and software to discuss. Read our full roundup of what to expect (and not expect) on Tuesday, October 22nd, from Apple:

Mavericks: OS X Mavericks is Apple’s next Mac OS, and it’s packed with new features that bring the OS more in-line with iOS, while still focusing on the pro market. The OS gains Maps and iBooks functionality, but also introduces some speed improvements, multiple-monitor-support, and a souped up Finder application. We already reported several times that sources say Mavericks will launch toward the end of October, and now we’re hearing some more specifics on that: sources say that Apple is currently planning to release OS X Mavericks via the Mac App Store this week.

These people say that Apple will provide final release details and pricing for the new software at its October 22nd Media Event. Apple has internally discussed releasing Mavericks publicly as soon as on the event day, but sources say that a release between Wednesday and Friday is just as likely. Additionally, Apple is preparing its retail staff to install the new OS on store computers later this week. The price? Currently uncertain, but we speculate that it will be around the $19 required for Mountain Lion.

As a side note, some readers are reporting that the Mavericks GM build has silently been updated from build 13A598 to 13A603, but we have not been able to independently verify the claims. It’s unclear if this tweaked GM (assuming it is real) will push the release back, but that is certainly plausible.

Macs: Besides the new Mac OS, expect talk of a release timeframe (read: month) and pricing for the Mac Pro (read: expensive!), the likely introduction of new Retina MacBook Pros with improved battery life (thanks to Intel’s Haswell chips), an improved FaceTime chat camera, and 802.11ac WiFi. Apple previously said that the trash can-lookalike Mac Pro would arrive in the fall, while multiple sources say that the Retina MacBook Pros are constrained in a pre-WWDC MacBook Air-like fashion. Earlier this month, Apple beefed up the iMac’s specs, but a new Mac mini launch is yet to occur. Perhaps this week, too, but that’s not certain.

Software: Also on the docket for later this year: a new version of iWork for both Mac and iOS, but it’s uncertain if those software products will gain spotlight at Yerba Buena. In terms of iWork-sidekick iLife, expect redesigned versions for iOS, potentially with some fancy new letterpress card functionality in the iPhoto app (remember Cards?).

Apple TV: One thing not to count on: a new Apple TV. We’ve been hearing strong whispers for the past few months that Apple is making progress on a new version of the Apple TV (with a motion-controlled variant to arrive in the coming years), but it does not sound like any new hardware is in the cards for this week (or, at least, to ship imminently).

Apple has previewed versions of the Apple TV several months before launch, so an introduction this week with a ship date well into the future would not come without precedent. Leaning towards no Apple TV talk, however, are new reports of small water drops on previous Apple TV claims and multiple sources telling us that supply of the current Apple TV is readily available.

Coverage: Apple Director Al Gore says Apple watchers should “tune in” to the event, and you can do just that at 9to5Mac. No matter what goes down on Tuesday, October 22nd, we’ll be covering late-breaking-news from before the keynote, the actual proceedings, and we will be providing all of the follow-up coverage you come to expect after the event.

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Sas/Access: Product Overview And Insight

SAS/Access does just one thing but does it well: it integrates data from third-party databases into SAS. Organizations that use the flagship SAS software might find SAS/Access to be a very cost-effective way to integrate data from other systems into SAS. However, if they need additional data integration features, they will likely want to investigate other products, either from SAS or another vendor.

Jump to: SAS/Access Features Table

Founded in 1976 as “Statistical Analysis System,” SAS is a private software company headquartered in Cary, North Carolina. Two of its original co-founders — James Goodnight and John Sall — continue to serve on the company’s executive team 42 years after its creation. It had $3.24 billion in revenue in 2023 and has more than 14,300 employees. Its software is installed at more than 83,000 sites in 147 countries, and 96 of the top 100 on the 2023 Fortune Global 500 list are SAS customers.

SAS claims to be “the leader in analytics” It offers solutions related to AI and machine learning, customer intelligence, risk management, data management, fraud and security intelligence, the Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing. Gartner estimates that around 14,000 organizations use its data integration solutions, which include SAS Data Management, SAS Data Integration Server, SAS Federation Server, SAS/Access, SAS Data Loader for Hadoop and SAS Event Stream Processing.

While SAS offers other, more full-featured data integration products, SAS/Access focuses on integrating the flagship SAS software with third-party databases – making a worthy pick for a wide array of users. It promises “seamless, transparent read, write and update access to data, regardless of source or platform,” and it doesn’t require knowledge of SQL. Its designed for business users and includes data integrity and security features.

When purchasing the software, users will need to specify which data source they plan to integrate with SAS. In other words, the product doesn’t include a full set of connectors for all the possibilities; instead, users purchase only the connectors they need for their specific situation.

On-premise

Proprietary

SAS/ACCESS deploys alongside the flagship SAS software. The latest version, SAS Viya, runs on Linux or Cloud Foundry. It requires a quad-core 64-bit processor, 16 GB RAM and 50 GB storage space. The system will perform better with more cores and more RAM.

It also requires Java and the Apache Web server.

Teradata, Aster Data, Apache Impala, Datacom, Greenplum, Netezza, Vertica, Informix, SAP HANA, SAP R3, SAP ASE, SAP IQ, DB2, Oracle and Oracle RDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, MySQL, Amazon Redshift, JDBC – SAS Viya, Spark SQL – SAS Viya, ODBC and OLE DB connectors.

Graphic interface designed for business users

Seamless, transparent data access

Flexible query language support

Performance tuning options

Metadata integration

Bulk loading

Temporary table support

Data integrity and security

Training, support and consulting available through SAS and partners

$3,290 per unit. Note that when you purchase SAS/ACCESS, you need to specify which source data you would like to integrate with SAS.

Features SAS/Access

Deployment On-premise

System Requirements

Operating System Linux or Cloud Foundry

Processor 4-core 64-bit

RAM 16 GB

Storage 50 GB

Software SAS, Java, Apache Web server

Connectors Teradata, Aster Data, Apache Impala, Datacom, Greenplum, Netezza, Vertica, Informix, SAP HANA, SAP R3, SAP ASE, SAP IQ, DB2, Oracle and Oracle RDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, MySQL, Amazon Redshift, JDBC – SAS Viya, Spark SQL – SAS Viya, ODBC and OLE DB

Design and Development Environment Graphic interface designed for business users

Key Capabilities

ELT Yes

ETL No, but available through other SAS software

CDC No, but available through other SAS software

Data Quality No, but available through other SAS software

Data Governance No, but available through other SAS software

Others Metadata integration

Support and Services Training, support and consulting available through SAS and partners

Gartner Magic Quadrant Rating Leader

Price $3,290

Features SAS/Access

Deployment On-premise

System Requirements

Operating System Linux or Cloud Foundry

Processor 4-core 64-bit

RAM 16 GB

Storage 50 GB

Software SAS, Java, Apache Web server

Connectors Teradata, Aster Data, Apache Impala, Datacom, Greenplum, Netezza, Vertica, Informix, SAP HANA, SAP R3, SAP ASE, SAP IQ, DB2, Oracle and Oracle RDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, MySQL, Amazon Redshift, JDBC – SAS Viya, Spark SQL – SAS Viya, ODBC and OLE DB

Design and Development Environment Graphic interface designed for business users

Key Capabilities

ELT Yes

ETL No, but available through other SAS software

CDC No, but available through other SAS software

Data Quality No, but available through other SAS software

Data Governance No, but available through other SAS software

Others Metadata integration

Support and Services Training, support and consulting available through SAS and partners

Gartner Magic Quadrant Rating Leader

Price $3,290

Ibm Cognos Analytics: Product Overview And Insight

See the full list of Top Data Mining Tools

Geared for large enterprises with a substantial budget, IBM Cognos Analytics delivers a robust data mining platform for organizations looking to extract value from diverse sets of data. It focuses on self-service visualizations and dashboards—and it includes strong artificial intelligence and machine learning functionality.

This approach helps users spot patterns and behavior that might otherwise not be visible. The system also allows users to pose questions and explore data using a natural language-powered AI assistant. Ideally, this approach reduces the time required for data preparation and processing.

Clearly, IBM has is a heavyweight in the world of business intelligence and analytics. Recently, the company updated and rebranded its flagship BI and analytics offering, now IBM Cognos Analytics, to reflect the changing requirements of organizations. This includes combining production reporting tools with more powerful self-service dashboards—and a more unified platform for reporting and analytics.

In short, if your company can afford it, this is a market-leading tool with next-gen features.

IBM’s focus is on delivering the right information to the right people at the right time. In order to achieve this objective, IBM Cognos Analytics includes tools for importing diverse sets of data, identifying missing data, incorrect data and misleading information.

Using AI, it examines data sets and offers insights into how the data can be best displayed and used. The built-in AI component provides smarter self-service capabilities than in the past. What’s more, the platform is designed to deliver self-service data exploration and visualizations that are appropriate to a user’s role. The product is available on-premise as well as in the cloud—with a single interface for desktops, laptops and mobile devices. It includes scheduling and subscriptions to data. Users report that the platform has become more intuitive and easier to use since it was updated to look more like IBM Watson Analytics in 2024.

Business analysts, power developers, data scientists. However, the platform can present challenges for casual users.

Graphical drag-and drop.

Support for extract, transform and load (ETL) processes, integration with data warehouses, and support for other data integration and SQL tools. Accepts multidimensional and relational data sources.

Ad Hoc Analysis

Ad Hoc Reporting

OLAP

Predictive Analytics

Customizable dashboard

Yes

IBM has a 3.9 rating at Gartner Peer insights.

Trial version of the premium edition is free. Premium edition running in a multi-tenant cloud costs $70 per user per month. Enterprise edition cost available directly from the company.

IBM Cognos

Focus Strategic management through guided data discovery. 

Key features and capabilities Strong ETL and reporting tools. Powerful machine learning and AI. Contextualized smart searching and data modeling based on keywords and customized requirements.

Mature platform that offers a high level of flexibility. Some concerns about stability and self-service functions.

Pricing and licensing Trial version of the premium edition is free. Premium edition running in a multi-tenant cloud costs $70 per user per month. Enterprise edition cost available directly from the company.

IBM Cognos

Focus Strategic management through guided data discovery. 

Key features and capabilities Strong ETL and reporting tools. Powerful machine learning and AI. Contextualized smart searching and data modeling based on keywords and customized requirements.

Mature platform that offers a high level of flexibility. Some concerns about stability and self-service functions.

Pricing and licensing Trial version of the premium edition is free. Premium edition running in a multi-tenant cloud costs $70 per user per month. Enterprise edition cost available directly from the company.

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