Trending February 2024 # Fabio Ciucci: Extreme Java Artist # Suggested March 2024 # Top 7 Popular

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Fabio Ciucci is a true Java pioneer — a developer of computer-generated visual effects ever since the introduction of the language. Although he isn’t a celebrity like that other Fabio constantly seen on the covers of romance novels, you have probably seen many of his works without knowing the real artist behind the scene.

Since 1996, Ciucci has won almost all the top awards in the Java community, including those from Gamelan, JARS, Tucows, ZDNet, and so on. He currently runs his own company along with a small team of Java developers, called AnfyTeam. The site, chúng tôi is translated into 31 languages (no kidding, folks!) and gets half a million visitors from all over the world each month.

In addition to his official honors, some people (including myself) believe he has introduced two important things to the Java community: application inspiration and artistic content. During the old Java days, lots of simple but dull applets (e.g., scrollers, clocks) flooded the World Wide Web. His Java applets demonstrated and made you believe that with a careful programming tune-up, it was not impossible for Java to perform many complicated mathematical calculations in real-time. (Remember when Java was heavily criticized for its slow performance in browsers back at the beginning?)

too much about software and hardware performance issues.

As for the artistic flavor he brought to Java, here are some words from the man himself: “Well … born in Lucca, Italy (near Pisa’s tower and Florence), my work in visual effects are probably influenced by Renaissance style.” There is no doubt that his academic training at the Institute of the Arts and Florence Architecture University certainly helped shape his artistic views as well.

“I was ‘definitely lucky’,” he said. “Java was released to the Internet public when I was searching for a new operating system to program. In fact, in late 1995, I was skilled in programming the market-dead Amiga computers and MS-DOS applications, but I was not enthusiastic about Microsoft Windows programming. It was also because I didn’t want to learn another operating system and trash my programs again a few years later. When Java came out, I read ‘write once, run anywhere’, which seemed to be a perfect solution to me.”

Inspired by Java’s and the Web’s capabilities and potentials, he decided to set up his own online company as his audience continued to grow. He then discontinued architecture and pursued his dream of being a cyber-architect rather than a real-world one. With the combination of his Java and art skills, his company has taken the Java world surprise and has been successful since.

One of the main characteristics of his team is that products are made by groups of skilled programmers who also consider themselves artists. The variety of their audience also tells the story. They range from webmasters, to developers, to artists.

AnfyTeam also does custom work for corporations on a contract basis, which has attracted some major companies to them, such as Intel Corp. To let more people share their expertise, the team’s most recent project is to convert their own proprietary 3D classes into an application programming interface (API) available for download to the general public. This state-of-the-art package is a valid alternative to Sun’s Java 3D APIs, especially as it runs on actual browsers, unlike Java 1.2 3D, which is still not supported. And it is intended for real-time 3D Web applications. Feel free to check out their 3D site for more details.

AnfyTeam has created several original applets that you see all over the place on the Web. The team prides itself on the originality of these. In an era in which the Internet is creating more greed than original thought, conceptual design has been blurred by stolen ideas everywhere. The team still believes they can make a difference, however, in their design work. How do they intend to achieve this?

best.”

visual-effect applet in a school lesson.”

applications in Web browsers. Here are Ciucci’s views on this.

recognized standard and will continue to exist for a long time.

too much about software and hardware performance issues.

than static and boring HTML pages.”

site called The J Maker.

You're reading Fabio Ciucci: Extreme Java Artist

Examples To Implement Java Mouselistener

Introduction to Java MouseListener

Web development, programming languages, Software testing & others

Declaration: Java MouseListener interface can be declared using the following syntax.

Public interface MouseListener extends EventListener Methods of Java MouseListener

2. mouseEntered(MouseEventev): This method will get invoked when a Mouse is entering a component.

3. mouseExited(MouseEventev): This method will get invoked when a Mouse is exiting a component.

4. mousePressed(MouseEventev): This method will get invoked when a Mouse button is pressed on a component.

5. mouseReleased(MouseEventev): This method will get invoked when a Mouse button is released on a component.

How Java MouseListener works?

This will help in the invocation of the relevant method.

After the invocation, the Mouse event is passed to it.

Examples

Below are the different examples:

Example #1

Java program to implement MouseListener Interface

Code:

import java.awt.FlowLayout; import java.awt.Frame; import java.awt.Label; import java.awt.event.MouseEvent; import java.awt.event.MouseListener; public class JMouseListenerExample implements MouseListener { Label lbl1, lbl2; Frame fr; String s; JMouseListenerExample() { fr = new Frame("Java Mouse Listener Example"); lbl1= new Label("Demo for the mouse event", Label.CENTER); lbl2= new Label(); fr.setLayout(new FlowLayout()); fr.add(lbl1); fr.add(lbl2); fr.addMouseListener(this); fr.setSize(350,220); fr.setVisible(true); } { lbl2.setText(s); fr.setVisible(true); } public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent ev) { lbl2.setText("Now, the mouse has entered the area of window"); fr.setVisible(true); } public void mouseExited(MouseEvent ev) { lbl2.setText("Mouse has left the area of window"); fr.setVisible(true); } public void mousePressed(MouseEvent ev) { lbl2.setText("Mouse button is being pressed"); fr.setVisible(true); } public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent ev) { s="Firstly, the mouse button is released and "; lbl2.setText(s); fr.setVisible(true); } public static void main(String args[]) { new JMouseListenerExample(); } }

Output:

An output as shown below will be displayed on executing the code.

When the mouse enters the window, a label showing a mouse entered the window area will be displayed.

Similarly, when the mouse leaves the window, the following label will be shown.

Moreover, on pressing the mouse, a text will be displayed on the window as depicted below.

Example #2

Code:

import java.awt.Color; import java.awt.Frame; import java.awt.event.MouseEvent; import java.awt.event.MouseListener; public class JMouseListenerExample extends Frame implements MouseListener { public JMouseListenerExample( ) { addMouseListener(this); setSize(350,350); setVisible(true); } public void mousePressed(MouseEvent ev) { setBackground(Color.green); System.out.println("Pressing Mouse"); } public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent ev) { setBackground(Color.pink); System.out.println("Released the mouse"); } { setBackground(Color.yellow); } public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent ev) { setBackground(Color.red); System.out.println("Entered the window"); } public void mouseExited(MouseEvent ev) { setBackground(Color.white); System.out.println("Mouse left the window"); } public static void main(String args[]) { new JMouseListenerExample(); } }

Output:

In this program, background colors will be changed on different mouse events and at the same time, a text will be displayed on the console.

Firstly, on entering the window, the background color will be red.

Similarly on leaving the window, color changes to white.

When the mouse is pressed, the green color will be displayed.

Conclusion

It is a class that gets notified when certain mouse events happen. More details such as declaration, methods, and implementation of Java  MouseListener is discussed in this document in detail.

Recommended Article

This is a guide to Java MouseListener. Here we discuss the introduction to MouseListener along with the respective examples to implement Java MouseListener. You can also go through our other suggested articles to learn more –

Overloading And Overriding In Java

Introduction to Overloading and Overriding in Java

Web development, programming languages, Software testing & others

Overloading in Java

When a java class has multiple methods with the same name but with different arguments, we call it Method Overloading. By keeping the name the same, we are just increasing the readability of the program code. For example, suppose we need to perform some addition operation on some given numbers. Let us say the name of our method is “addition()”.  Here, addition can be done between two numbers, three numbers, or more. Hence, depending upon how many numbers will be involved in the additional operation, we can change the function’s arguments (or parameters). But, instead of this, if you would write different methods for the different number of arguments, it will be difficult to recognize as the name would be different.  Hence, by overloading, we are achieving better readability of our code. So now the question is, how will we achieve overloading?

Let’s look at those ones by one with example codes.

Method #1 – By modifying the number of parameters

So here, we will do additional operation on some numbers. For this, let us create a class called “AdditionOperation”. Inside that class, let’s have two methods named “addition()”. In one of those methods, we will perform an addition of two numbers. In the other, we will perform the addition of three numbers. This we will achieve by simply changing the number of parameters in those methods, but we will keep the name the same. In this way, we are overloading the method “addition()” here.

Code:

public class AdditionOperation { static int addition(int num1,int num2){return num1+num2;} static int addition(int num1,int num2,int num3){return num1+num2+num3;} public static void main(String args[]) { system.out.printin(addition(35,36)); system.out.printin(addition(35,36,37)); } }

Output:

Method #2 – By modifying the datatype

Code:

public class additionOperation { static int addition(int num1,int num2){return num1+num2;} static double addition(double num1,num2){return num1+num2;} public static void main(String args[]) { system.out.printin(addition(35,36)); system.out.printin(addition(35.5,36.6)); } }

Output:

Points to be Noted for Overloading

Overloading in java is basically a “compile-time polymMethod Overloading in C#orphism”. Compile-time polymorphism in java is also called as “Static method Dispatch” or “Early binding”. So what do I mean by that jargon?

As the name suggests, polymorphism is basically an ability to take many forms (poly: many, morph: form). So, here linking or binding of the overriden function and the object is done compile time. Hence it is called compile-time polymorphism.

Basically, the binding of function to object is done early before run time (i. e., during compile time); hence, it is also named “Early binding”.

Static dispatch is a type of polymorphism or method dispatch which tells how java will select which functionality of the method will be used in compile time. (I mean, whether it will perform the addition of two numbers or three numbers in our coding example).  So the name is also known as the Static method Dispatch.

Overriding in Java

When a java subclass or child class has a method that is of the same name and contains the same parameters or arguments and similar return type as a method that is present in its superclass or parent class, then we can call the method of the child class as an overridden method of the method of its parent class.

For example, suppose we need to perform some display operation according to its class type. If I call the method of a parent class, it will display a message defined in a parent class. But, when we call the child class’s method, it will override the display message of its parent class and show the display message, which is defined inside the method of the child class. Hence depending on which display we need to show, we can call the related class (parent or child). Here we are not changing the method name, argument and return type. We are just changing the functionality of the method in child class. But, instead of this, if we do not do overriding, i. e. we don’t give the specific implementation of the child method, then while calling the method, it will display the same message as present in a parent class.

While writing code, we will use @Override annotation before the method to be overridden. @Override annotation tells the compiler that the method is supposed to override a method that was declared in a superclass. Although it is not mandatory to use this, it helps to prevent errors. If a method that is annotated with @Override fails to override a method, the compiler generates an error.

Rules for Java Method Overriding

The method must have the same name as in the parent class

The method must have the same parameter as in the parent class.

There must be an IS-A relationship (inheritance).

Code:

class Parent { public void display() { system.out.printin("Hello, I am from parent class"); } } class Sub extends Parent { public void display() { system.out.printin("Hello, I am from child class"); } } public class Overriding { public static void main?(String args[]) { Parent superObject = new Parent (); superObject.display(); Parent subObject = new Sub(); subObject.display(); Sub subObject2 = new Sub(); subObject2.display(); } }

Limitations in method Overriding:

Private methods of the parent class cannot be overridden.

Final methods cannot be overridden

Static methods cannot be overridden

Points to be Noted for Overriding

Overriding in java is basically “Run time polymorphism”. Run time polymorphism in java is also called as “Dynamic method Dispatch” or “Late binding”. So what is meant by that jargon?

As the name suggests, polymorphism is basically an ability to take many forms (poly: many, morph: form). So, here call to an overriden function with the object is done the run time. Hence called run time polymorphism.

Basically, the binding of function to object is done late, which is after compilation (i. e., during run time); hence, it is also named “Late binding”.

Dynamic dispatch is a type of polymorphism or method dispatch which tells how java will select which functionality of the method will be used in run time. So the name is also known as Dynamic method Dispatch.

Conclusion

This concludes our learning of the topic “Overloading and Overriding in Java”. Write the codes mentioned in the above examples in the java compiler and check the output. Learning of codes will be incomplete if you will not do hands-on by yourself, enhancing your coding skills.  Happy coding!!

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to the Overloading and Overriding in Java. Here we discuss methods in Overloading along with rules and limitations of Overriding in Java. You can also go through our other suggested articles to learn more –

Java Tutorial For Beginners, Part 2

A method to the madness

Code

public void sayHello() { System.out.println("Hello!");

Code

public String sayHello() { return "Hello!"; }

This is ‘returning’ a string and so it is a ‘public string’. That means that we can use the method as though it were a string, so:

Code

System.out.println(theText);

Normally, we would include some more code in the method that would manipulate the string in some way. For instance, we could return the day or the time. You can return mostly any type of data. You could just as easily use public int sayTheTime() for examplle.

Finally, we can use the brackets in order to ‘feed in’ variables that can be used within the code inside method. So for instance, we could send a number in, perform a sum on that number and then return the result:

Code

public int timesTen(int numberToChange) { return numberToChange * 10; }

Remember that you can also access methods from other classes, as long as the methods are ‘public’ rather than ‘private’. And the method is ‘static’, then that means that you don’t need to create a new instance of the object in order to access it. This is mainly a matter of organization, so don’t worry right now if you don’t understand everythin. But you’ll see methods used constantly and it’s useful to know their role.

An introduction to arrays

As well as discussing classes, part one also discussed variables. Gary described variables as being like ‘containers’ for information; information in the form of numbers, strings and more. These variables are what enable us to manipulate our data throughout our code. For a much better and more detailed explanation of all this, be sure to check out the first post.

Code

String ShoppingList[] = {"apples", "oranges", "pears", "milk", "eggs"};

Code

for(int i=0; i<ShoppingList.length; i++) { System.out.println(ShoppingList[i]);

Code

for (String element: ShoppingList) { System.out.println(element); }

In the foreach loop above the variable element (which is of type String) takes the value of each item in the array, sequentially. So the first time around the loop element is equal to “apples”, on the next iteration it is “oranges”, and so on. Next time I’ll talk a little about using ‘maps’, which allow you to look up specific information in a much more dynamic manner.

Conditional statements

So we already know how to use loops to perform the same task over and over. You might remember this from last time:

Code

for

(

int

i=

1

; i<=

10

; i++) { System.

out

.println(

"i is: "

+ i);

Code

for(int i=1; i<=10; i++) { if(i == 5) { System.out.println("Halfway there!"); } System.out.println("i is: " + i);

Code

for(int i=1; i<=10; i++) { if(i == 5) { System.out.println("Halfway there!"); } else { System.out.println("i is: " + i); } }

But what if you want to test more than one statement in order? In that case, else if comes in handy:

Code

for(int i=1; i<=10; i++) { if(i == 5) { System.out.println("Halfway there!"); } else if(i==10){ System.out.println("Finished"); } else { System.out.println("i is: " + i); }

Code

String User = "Adam"; System.out.println("Hello " + User); }

Essentially, and and or act like ‘logic gates’ as used in electronics – but you don’t need to worry about that!

Comparing variables

Next time…

Types Of Java References With Examples

Introduction to Java References Types of Java References with Examples

There are four types of java references based on the Garbage Collector’s behaviour on the references.

Strong References: This is the default reference in java. Strong references can be created when an object is defined regularly.

Weak References: This reference is to be explicitly specified. The weak references can be created by using java.lang.ref.WeakReference class.

Soft References: Soft references can be created by using lang.ref.SoftReference class.

Phantom References: the phantom references can be created by using lang.ref.PhantomReference class.

1. Strong References

A strong reference is usually we use while we write the java code or we create an object. An object which has strong reference and active in the memory is not eligible for garbage collection, an object which has strongly referenced points to null can be garbage collected. For example, the below code snippet where variable ob is the object of the type ClassA.

ClassA ob = new ClassA();

An ‘ob’ object is having a strong reference to which is pointing to class ClassA; this object can not be garbage collected because an ob is an active object.

If reference ‘ob’ point to null as below –

ob = null;

Now the object is not referencing to class ClassA; an object is eligible for garbage collection now.

Example

Code:

package p1; class ClassA { } public class Demo { public static void main( String[] arg ) { ClassA ob = new ClassA(); System.out.println(ob); ob = null; System.out.println(ob); } }

Output:

2. Weak References ClassA ob = new ClassA();

Now the object is weak referencing to class ClassA, an object is now available for garbage collection, and it is garbage collected when JVM runs garbage collection thread.

Example

Code:

package p1; import java.lang.ref.WeakReference; class ClassA { } public class Demo { public static void main( String[] arg ) { ClassA ob = new ClassA();  System.out.println(ob); ob = null; System.out.println(ob); ob = weakob.get(); System.out.println(ob); } }

Output:

3. Soft References

The object of soft reference is not eligible for garbage collection until JVM runs out of memory or JVM badly needs memory. The weak references can be created by class lang.ref.SoftReference. For example, the soft reference can create Similarly to weak reference.

Example package p1; import java.lang.ref.SoftReference; class ClassA { } public class Demo { public static void main( String[] arg ) { ClassA ob = new ClassA();// default reference or Strong Reference System.out.println(ob); ob = null; System.out.println(ob); ob = softob.get(); System.out.println(ob); } }

Output:

4. Phantom References

An object of phantom reference is available for garbage collection, but before garbage collecting it, an object is put in a reference queue named as ‘reference queue’ by the JVM; after finalize() function call on the object. The weak references can be created by class chúng tôi PhantomReference.

Example

Code:

package p1; import java.lang.ref.ReferenceQueue; import java.lang.ref.PhantomReference; class ClassA { } public class Demo { public static void main( String[] arg ) { ClassA ob = new ClassA();  System.out.println(ob); ob = null; System.out.println(ob); ob = phantomob.get(); System.out.println(ob); } }

Output:

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Java References. Here we also discuss the Introduction and types of java references along with different examples and their code implementation. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

Shuffling Elements Of Unordered Collections In Java

There are two types of collections in Java. One is ordered and the other one is unordered collection. The ordered collections store their elements in the order in which they are inserted i.e. it maintains the insertion order of elements. Whereas, the unordered collections such as Map and Set do not maintain any order.

In this article, we will create an unordered collection and try to shuffle its elements using the inbuilt method ‘Collections.shuffle()’.

Program to shuffle elements of Unordered Collection Set SortedSet Interface

This interface has the term ‘Sorted’ in its name which signifies that it contains all the elements in ascending order. It extends the properties of the Set interface. To use the features of SortedSet, we will use tree set class that implements SortedSet interface.

Syntax

Here, element_Type is the wrapper class not primitive datatypes.

Collections.shuffle()

This method is provided by ‘java.util’ package and serves as a shuffler. It takes a collection as an argument and then rearranges the elements randomly.

Syntax Collections.shuffle( nameOfcollection ); Working of Code

We will create a Tree Set named ‘treeSt’ and store a few elements of type String using an inbuilt method ‘add()’.

Now, create a new ArrayList and copy all the elements of the previous Tree Set.

In the end, use the method ‘Collections.shuffle()’ to shuffle the elements of ArrayList and then print them.

Example import java.util.*; public class Srtset { public static void main(String args[]) { treeSt.add("Tutorix"); treeSt.add("Simply"); treeSt.add("Easy"); treeSt.add("Learning"); treeSt.add("Tutorials"); treeSt.add("Point"); System.out.println("Elements of the given set without performing shuffling: "); System.out.println(treeSt); Collections.shuffle(arayList); System.out.println("Shuffled elements of the given set: "); System.out.println(arayList); } } Output Elements of the given set without performing shuffling: [Easy, Learning, Point, Simply, Tutorials, Tutorix] Shuffled elements of the given set: [Easy, Simply, Learning, Tutorix, Tutorials, Point] Program to shuffle elements of Unordered Collection Map Tree Map

It is a class that is used to implement NavigableMap Interface. It stores the elements of the map in a tree structure. To sort the LinkedHashMap elements we need to use this class. The most obvious reason for this is that it provides an efficient alternative to store the key-value pairs in sorted order.

The general syntax for TreeMap is as follows −

Syntax Working of Code

Create an object of TreeMap named ‘workers’ and use the ‘put()’ method that will insert elements to it.

Moving ahead, use the method ‘Collections.shuffle()’ to shuffle the elements of ArrayList.

In the end, define a for-each loop to print the newly shuffled elements. The ‘getKey()’ method will retrieve the key and ‘getValue()’ will fetch its corresponding value.

Example import java.util.*; public class Suffle { public static void main(String args[]) { workers.put("Vaibhav", 4000); workers.put("Ansh", 3000); workers.put("Vivek", 1500); workers.put("Aman", 2000); workers.put("Tapas", 2500); System.out.println("Elements of the map: "); for (String unKey : workers.keySet()) { System.out.println("Name: " + unKey + ", Salary: " + workers.get(unKey)); } Collections.shuffle(arayList); System.out.println("Elements of the newly shuffled map: "); System.out.println("Name: " + print.getKey() + ", Salary: " + print.getValue()); } } } Output Elements of the map: Name: Aman, Salary: 2000 Name: Ansh, Salary: 3000 Name: Tapas, Salary: 2500 Name: Vaibhav, Salary: 4000 Name: Vivek, Salary: 1500 Elements of the newly shuffled map: Name: Vaibhav, Salary: 4000 Name: Aman, Salary: 2000 Name: Vivek, Salary: 1500 Name: Ansh, Salary: 3000 Name: Tapas, Salary: 2500 Conclusion

In this article, we have learned how we can shuffle the elements of an unordered collection with the help of examples. We also discovered two of the unordered collections named Map and Set.

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