Trending February 2024 # Jdiskreport Is A Cool Free Disk Analyzer – But It Requires Java To Work # Suggested March 2024 # Top 8 Popular

You are reading the article Jdiskreport Is A Cool Free Disk Analyzer – But It Requires Java To Work updated in February 2024 on the website Eastwest.edu.vn. We hope that the information we have shared is helpful to you. If you find the content interesting and meaningful, please share it with your friends and continue to follow and support us for the latest updates. Suggested March 2024 Jdiskreport Is A Cool Free Disk Analyzer – But It Requires Java To Work

It is very important to track all the drives/directories on your PC for smoothing functioning. While there are many free disk space analyzer software available which let you check all your PC drives and their files and folders, JDiskReport is different. It requires Java to work! In this post, we will talk about this Java-based tool which helps you check the details like size, free space available, capacity, etc., of all your PC directories.

JDiskReport is Java-based

JDiskReport is a Java-based free disk analyzer that helps you keep a check on the drives of your PC. What differentiates it from other such programs is that it uses five different perspectives to show you how your disks are running out of space. Available for almost every platform, including Windows, Linux and Mac. JDiskReport recommends that you have Java 7 or later installed on your system.

Read: Staying safe on the Internet with Java; or being safer without it.

It is a very simple and lightweight tool that takes less than a minute to land on your PC. Just download the setup file and install in on your PC. Once launched, the main overview shows you two tabs, namely- Scan file tree and Open Scan.

Run the scan, and the tool starts scanning your selected directories on the disk drive. The scanning may take time according to the size of the selected drive.

The tool displays the report in two-column, where in one column shows the folders of the selected directory and the other column shows the detailed report of what’s using your storage space. You can view the report as a list, as a bar graph, or as a pie chart.

There is a small menu ribbon on the result page which has the tabs -Size, Top 50, Size Dist, Modified, and Type. The Size tab shows the size of the selected drive, Top 50 tab shows the files occupying the maximum space. Size Dist shows how much of your storage space is occupied by files of a certain size. For example, you will know how many files are of size 1GB-4GB, or 4GB-16 GB or how many of them are more than 16 GB etc. So, basically, you know the largest and smallest sizes of files stored on the specific drive.

The Modified tab shows how often you are modifying your files. So, now you know how many files you haven’t changed in the last how many years. However, you just get to know the figures and won’t really be able to check the files and folders which you haven’t modified for long.

Then comes the Types tab which obviously shows the file type or the format of files occupying the storage space. So, you know that how much of space is occupied by your movies, your music files, image files, etc.

So, overall, JDiskReport is a nice tool to keep a track on all your PC directories and drives. I wish it had a feature to view or delete the files from the program it self. Before you download the tool, make sure that you have Java installed on your PC or else it won’t work. Download it here and see how you like it.

You're reading Jdiskreport Is A Cool Free Disk Analyzer – But It Requires Java To Work

Does Chat Gpt Plagiarize? Is It Plagiarism Free?

As chatgpt content gets populated on the internet, people started asking does Chat Gpt Plagiarize. Is Chat Gpt Plagiarism Free? If it is not doing plagiarism, is there any tool that can detect that?

AI chatbots raise concerns about plagiarism as they provide answers using input and training data. ChatGPT is no different and uses training data to provide rephrased answers and would hardly cite the source. And thereby raising questions about the originality of the text produced.

According to research undertaken by Penn University, AI language models often plagiarise content in different ways. So now, the question arises does ChatGPT also plagiarize? Let us find out the answer below. 

Chat GPT and plagiarism

Many people are worried about the possibility of plagiarism with Chat GPT’s human-like language generation feature, as it involves using someone else’s work without permission or giving them credit.

Although not widely used yet and still appearing somewhat clunky, the newest chatbot Chatgpt do not simply copy and paste text into their responses. Chat GPT uses NLP (Natural Language Processing), which can make identifying its text by just looking at it difficult.

But, as NPR pointed out in a December report on AI and plagiarism: “OpenAI…has signaled a commitment to preventing AI plagiarism and other nefarious applications”.

Does Chat Gpt Plagiarize?

Chat GPT itself cannot be plagiarized as it is a language model. However, the content generated by Chat GPT can be plagiarized if it closely resembles existing content without attribution.

ChatGPT does not plagiarize in the ordinary sense, i.e. it does not directly copy from a source. It creates new responses using the trained data. However, it uses the rephrased version of the existing database and sources. It might not directly copy-paste but may commit plagiarism of idea or plagiarism through paraphrasing and generating text close to the already existing data.

Thus, ChatGPT may create plagiarism-free text. However, it will not be original and can be the restructuring of an existing source. 

Is Chat Gpt Plagiarism Free?

ChatGPT does not directly copy-paste from a source but can copy the same idea and paraphrase the text. The content might be similar to some existing source and a restructured version. Therefore, we cannot say ChatGPT is truly free of plagiarism in the sense of the originality of the content.

The paraphrasing techniques used by Chatbots like ChatGPT raises the question of the authenticity and integrity of the generated text and thus, have led to criticism. OpenAI, the company which developed ChatGPT, announced that they might add watermarks to every response generated by ChatGPT.

It will ensure that content generated by ChatGPT is easily detected by using any chatgpt detector. This will reduce the possibility of people getting away with idea plagiarism or paraphrasing with the aid of ChatGPT. 

What is Chat Gpt Plagiarism Score?

There are various reports which tell about ChatGPT’s plagiarism score. Some say that it shows plagiarism of less than 5 percent. While some tools which can even detect AI-generated content, like Turnitin, show plagiarism a lot more than 5 percent.

Turnitin claims can identify any form of AI-generated content and thus, might show plagiarism scores higher than other plagiarism detector software.  

The plagiarism score is generated by various plagiarism detector tools showing the estimated percentage of text copied or written using AI tools. Thus, the plagiarism score of ChatGPT might vary on different plagiarism detectors. 

Is AI content plagiarism-free?

Just because something is AI generated, it doesn’t mean it’s free from plagiarism. AI has the ability to produce original content, but it can also create content that is similar to existing content. Hence, It is important to check AI-generated content for plagiarism before using it.

What is the best plagiarism checker?

There are numerous plagiarism checkers that you can use, some of which are free while others require payment. There are a few commonly used options such as Grammarly, Turnitin, and Copyscape. To make sure your work is original and correctly cited, it’s crucial to use a trustworthy plagiarism checker.

Does Chatgpt Give Everyone the Same Answer?

The simple answer is no. ChatGPT does not provide the same answer to everyone for the same question. It may be identical but never verbatim. Besides, if the context or input differs, the answer might differ.

ChatGPT provides answers based on the user’s preferences and demands of the user, and thus, the chance of people getting similar answers is also very low as people usually do not have the same kind of preferences.

Summing Up

ChatGPT might not be plagiarism free in a complete sense but it does not provide existing information verbatim. Many AI software can detect ChatGPT-generated content and, therefore, might flag it as plagiarized. 

Learn How Does Javafx Animation Work In Java?

Introduction to Java Animation

Animation in Java requires two basic steps, creating an animation frame and then allowing Java to color the frame. Applets, AWT, Swing, and JavaFX, can do Java animation. Applets animation is for browser-compatible applications, whereas AWT, Swing, and JavaFX are standalone applications. In real-time, most of the applications are standalone only. So, we will deal with our animation with JavaFX.

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Why JavaFX Why not AWT and Swing?

Types of Animations in JavaFX:

Rotate transition

Scale transition

Translate transition

Fade transition

Fill transition

Stroke transition

Sequential transition

Parallel transition

Pause transition

Path transition

How Does JavaFX Animation Work in Java?

JavaFX animation package is an animation that contains all the animation classes. So, while we are applying animations, we must import them. Apply animations to our class; we must extend the Animation class. This Animation class has all the required animation packages within it.

1. Rotate transition

This animation gives a rotation feature. The package is animation.RotateTransition

Syntax:

RotateTransition rotate = new RotateTransition();  rotate.play();  2. Scale Transition

This animation moves the object in all three directions X, Y, and Z. The package is animation.ScaleTransition

Syntax:

ScaleTransition rotate = new ScaleTransition();  rotate.play();  3. Translate transition

This animation moves the object from one position to another position at regular intervals of time. The package is animation.TranslateTransition

Syntax:

TranslateTransition rotate = new TranslateTransition();  rotate.play();  4. Fade transition

This animation makes the object dull by specifying the opacity value. The package is animation.FadeTransition

Syntax:

FadeTransition rotate = new FadeTransition();  rotate.play();  5. Fill transition

This animation makes the object fill with 2 colors, one after the other, by specifying the time interval. The package is animation.FillTransition

Syntax:

FillTransition rotate = new FillTransition();  rotate.play();  Examples

Let’s see the examples of java animation are given below:

Example #1 – Rotate Transition

Code:

package com.rotate.transition; import javafx.animation.RotateTransition; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.paint.Color; import javafx.scene.shape.Polygon; import javafx.scene.transform.Rotate; import javafx.stage.Stage; import javafx.util.Duration; public class RotateTransitionAnimation extends Application { @Override public void start(Stage outStage) throws Exception { Polygon traingle = new Polygon();// Creating triangle Double[] doubleValues=new Double[] { 5.0, 5.0, 20.0, 10.0, 10.0, 20.0 }; traingle.getPoints().addAll(doubleValues); traingle.setFill(Color.LIMEGREEN); traingle.setStroke(Color.HOTPINK); traingle.setStrokeWidth(5); RotateTransition rotateTransition = new RotateTransition();// Creating object for Rotate Transition class rotateTransition.setAxis(Rotate.Z_AXIS);// Set Axis rotation in Z axis rotateTransition.setByAngle(360);// Set angle rotation 360 degrees rotateTransition.setCycleCount(500);// Set cycle count rotation 500 rotateTransition.setDuration(Duration.millis(1000));// Set time duration for change the object rotateTransition.setAutoReverse(true);//auto reverse activation rotateTransition.setNode(traingle);//applying rotate transition on triangle rotateTransition.play();// applying rotation by play method Group root = new Group(); root.getChildren().add(traingle); Scene scene = new Scene(root, 700, 500, Color.BLACK);//creating scene outStage.setScene(scene);//adding scene to stage for display window outStage.setTitle("Triangle Rotate Transition"); outStage.show(); } public static void main(String[] args) { launch(args);//launch method calls start() method internally } }

Output:

In this way, the triangle rotates.

Example #2 – Scale Transition

Code:

package com.scale.transition; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.stage.Stage; import javafx.util.Duration; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.paint.Color; import javafx.scene.shape.Circle; import javafx.animation.ScaleTransition; import javafx.application.Application; public class ScaleTransitionAnimation extends Application { @Override public void start(Stage stage) { Circle circle = new Circle(); circle.setCenterX(280.0f);// position in X direction circle.setCenterY(125.0f);// position in Y direction circle.setRadius(40.0f);// circle radius circle.setFill(Color.AQUAMARINE);// circle color circle.setStrokeWidth(21);// stroke width of circle ScaleTransition scaleTransition = new ScaleTransition();// creating scaleTransition.setDuration(Duration.millis(2000));// set time duration scaleTransition.setNode(circle);// applying rotate transition node on scaleTransition.setByY(1.5);// Y direction movement scaleTransition.setByX(1.5);// X direction movement scaleTransition.setCycleCount(55);// Set cycle count rotation 55 scaleTransition.setAutoReverse(true);// auto reverse activation scaleTransition.play();// applying rotate transition on circle Group root = new Group(); root.getChildren().add(circle); Scene scene = new Scene(root, 600, 500, Color. AZURE);// creating scene stage.setScene(scene);// adding scene to stage for display window stage.setTitle("Circle Scale Transition"); stage.show(); } public static void main(String args[]) { launch(args); } }

Output:

In this way, the circle scales.

Example #3 – Translate Transition package com.translate.transition; import javafx.stage.Stage; import javafx.util.Duration; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.paint.Color; import javafx.scene.shape.Rectangle; import javafx.animation.TranslateTransition; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.scene.Group; public class TranslateTransitionAnimation extends Application { @Override public void start(Stage outStage) throws Exception { Rectangle square = new Rectangle(50, 50); square.setFill(Color.AQUA); square.setStroke(Color.BLUEVIOLET);// square area color TranslateTransition translateTranstion = new TranslateTransition();// creating object for Translate transition translateTranstion.setByY(350);// movement in Y direction translateTranstion.setDuration(Duration.millis(1500));// time duration translateTranstion.setCycleCount(450);// Set cycle count rotation 450 translateTranstion.setAutoReverse(true);// auto reverse activation translateTranstion.setNode(square);// applying rotate transition node on square translateTranstion.play();// applying rotate transition on circle Group root = new Group(); root.getChildren().add(square); Scene scene = new Scene(root, 600, 500, Color.CHOCOLATE);// creating scene outStage.setScene(scene);// adding scene to stage for display window outStage.setTitle("Square Translate Transition"); outStage.show(); } public static void main(String[] args) { launch(args); } }

Output:

This is how to square scale transition moves.

Example #4 – Fade Transition

Code:

package com.fade.transition; import javafx.animation.FadeTransition; import javafx.application.Application; import javafx.scene.Group; import javafx.scene.Scene; import javafx.scene.paint.Color; import javafx.scene.shape.Ellipse; import javafx.scene.shape.Rectangle; import javafx.stage.Stage; import javafx.util.Duration; public class FadeTransitionAnimation extends Application { @Override public void start(Stage outStage) throws Exception { Ellipse ellipse = new Ellipse();  ellipse.setCenterX(300.0f); ellipse.setCenterY(150.0f); ellipse.setRadiusX(150.0f); ellipse.setRadiusY(75.0f);//setting radius in y direction ellipse.setFill(Color.AQUA); ellipse.setStroke(Color.BLUEVIOLET);// ellipse area color FadeTransition fadeTransition = new FadeTransition();// creating Fade transition object fadeTransition.setDuration(Duration.millis(5000));// time duration fadeTransition.setFromValue(10);//setting opacity value for fading fadeTransition.setToValue(0.1); fadeTransition.setCycleCount(900);// Set cycle count rotation 900 fadeTransition.setAutoReverse(true);// auto reverse activation fadeTransition.setNode(ellipse);// applying fade transition node on ellipse fadeTransition.play();// applying fade transition on ellipse Group root = new Group(); root.getChildren().add(ellipse); Scene scene = new Scene(root, 600, 500, Color.CHOCOLATE);// creating scene outStage.setScene(scene);// adding scene to stage for display window outStage.setTitle("Ellipse Fade Transition"); outStage.show(); } public static void main(String[] args) { launch(args); } }

Output:

In this way, the fade transition happens.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Java Animation. Here we discuss the basic concept, how JavaFX animation works in Java, and different examples and code implementation. You may also look at the following articles to learn more –

Nft Marketplace Blur Is Beating Opensea, But Will It Last?

The Web3 landscape is shifting. With the explosive rise of the NFT marketplace and aggregator Blur in recent weeks and months, OpenSea now finds itself in an uncomfortable and unfamiliar position: it now has a legitimate contender for the title of NFT marketplace leader. 

If Blur’s steadily growing presence since its launch last year wasn’t indicative of this change, the previous month certainly has been. In the last 30 days alone, the platform has done $1.24 billion in trading volume. And OpenSea? Nearly $383 million. In the aftermath of Blur’s token launch on February 14, activity on the platform has skyrocketed. Every day since then, the marketplace has outpaced OpenSea in trading volume by as little as $35 million and as much as $100 million. 

Given OpenSea’s historical supremacy, those numbers feel like they’re the wrong way around. So, how did a platform that has dominated the NFT ecosystem for the last five years by a significant margin find itself in this position? And what does Blur’s success mean for the broader Web3 ecosystem? 

Up in a blur

It’s crucial to note the important ways in which OpenSea and Blur differ. The former is meant to appeal to as broad of a Web3 demographic as possible. While it does provide tools for NFT pro traders (whose focus is flipping digital assets for a profit), it mainly appeals to retail buyers. Retail buyers are more interested in buying NFTs for their art or are more likely to buy individual digital tokens here and there, but not in meaningfully high volumes or frequencies. 

Blur has made a name for itself by exclusively appealing to that pro-trader demographic. Platform founder Pacman admitted as much in an early January interview with Token Terminal, and it’s a strategy that the company has gotten almost absurdly good at executing. If it sounds strange that a platform with a more limited demographic focus is leaving the Amazon of NFTs in the dust, keep in mind that this niche group holds considerable financial sway in the ecosystem. 

Remember the insanely high levels of trading volume that Blur has been putting up lately? Ecosystem observers have noted that 50 percent of that volume comes from fewer than 300 wallets. On February 21, for example, just eight wallets on the platform traded 4,000 ETH or more on Blur, which rivals volume levels the entirety of OpenSea saw during its worst-performing days.

The high volume that comes out of the platform tends to center around a handful of sought-after, high-profile NFT projects whose names won’t surprise you: Bored Ape Yacht Club, Azuki, Mutant Ape Yacht Club, Pudgy Penguins, Moonbirds, Doodles, and the like.

How Blur encourages loyalty

One of the biggest reasons pro traders are flocking to Blur is its promise to users that it will reward them handsomely with future airdrops of the $BLUR token, totaling some $300 million during its next “season” of give-outs. At the time of writing, the token has a fully diluted market cap of $2.5 billion, and the Blur team is more than willing to throw its financial weight around to entice NFT traders to stick with them. 

Loyalty points are one of Blur’s methods of doing this. While the platform allows users to list their NFTs on other marketplaces, those who list explicitly on Blur will receive a 100 percent loyalty score. More loyalty equals more rewards in the future. 

Credit: Blur

It’s not just Blur’s innovations that have drawn users to it. Collector frustration with OpenSea has always been somewhat prevalent in the NFT space, even if just by virtue of the platform being the biggest name in the game. More legitimately, Web3 enthusiasts have been soured on the marketplace’s ever-shifting stance on creator royalties.

As of last October, OpenSea was the platform that had paid out the most royalties to creators by a wide margin, but a controversial November announcement from the company sparked what essentially amounted to Web3’s unionization movement. Beyond the royalties debate, it’s not hyperbole to say that almost nobody has been pleased with the platform’s stolen items policy, the marketplace’s reputation for not working well in times of high traffic, and its seeming centralized approach to, well, basically everything.  

So it didn’t help when Blur swooped in with surgical precision to seduce traders looking for a marketplace that could give them what they were looking for without all that baggage (and reward them handsomely for making the switch). And, once Blur’s token launched and sent it into the stratosphere, OpenSea responded by cutting royalties and temporarily disbarring its platform transaction fees for certain collections, frustrating creatives who helped build the space even further. 

Blur proponents have been quick to point out how the platform is paying out more royalties to creators than anyone else in recent weeks. While this is true, it’s partly because the marketplace absorbed a major portion of the trading volume its competitors would otherwise have facilitated those royalties payouts with.

OpenSea can’t lead the industry in royalties (as it once very much did) if its volume is being siphoned off to other platforms. What Blur has done better than OpenSea is incentivize people to pay full royalties on their NFT purchases through token rewards. It’s an interesting model for “enforcing” royalties in Web3 that comes with its own set of serious concerns, not least of which is that those payouts become contingent on a platform waving a shiny financial toy in front of a small group of influential users. It’s simply too early to claim that Blur’s approach to royalties works better than others simply because the numbers are doing well at the moment.

Credit: Blur

The problem with the numbers game

Blur’s wider-reaching effects on the Web3 space are manifold, but they might not all be positive. While high volumes and high royalties payouts are great for Web3, especially in a bear market, many in the space have been disturbed by the residual effect Blur’s success has had on the ecosystem.

Artist Bryan Brinkman highlighted a surreal moment on Blur last week when he witnessed NFTs from Michael Kozlowski’s recent Art Blocks drop, Metropolis, trading on the platform even when the images of the art were not loading on the site due to lag. 

Ah yes, the way Artblocks were meant to be traded. chúng tôi Bryan Brinkman (@bryanbrinkman) February 22, 2023

While the images did eventually load, the point remains: seeing digital assets from creatives treated as fodder for financial gain is more than a little unsettling for many in the NFT space. However, some have suggested that this dynamic is simply Blur capitalizing on what the Web3 market is really about, stripped of any rhetorical veneer of community or culture. 

Regardless, Blur is moving forward in strident fashion. Dropping all pretense, the platform told its users to block OpenSea in a February 15 blog post. The reason? The way both OpenSea and Blur have set up their infrastructure means that creators can’t earn full royalties on both platforms — users have to choose. 

Where do we go from here?

Blur needs to be careful in how it manages its user base and how it perceives its loyalty. It’s not the first NFT marketplace to entice pro traders with token farming. And it would be a mistake for the platform to presume that the wallets driving its phenomenal rise right now will do anything but jump ship if another offers them a better financial incentive to do so. Blur’s unabashed lean into the pro-trader demographic and clever airdrop mechanisms mean it’s likely to hold the interest of this demographic for some time, but the challenge will be drawing out loyalty in the long term.

More important than what Blur does next is what its ripple effects do to the rest of the space. The marketplace’s monumental rise isn’t necessarily a bad thing; the NFT world should celebrate the fact that there is such an attentive and inventive platform out there dedicated to serving the needs of pro traders.

No one platform is responsible for putting pressure on the royalties dynamic in the NFT space. Still, Blur and OpenSea are at least somewhat culpable for pushing it forward into what many now see as an accelerated race to the bottom. Creators, as always, are caught in the middle.

Beyond this, Web3 needs to ensure it’s innovating and catering to the needs of every demographic in the space, not just pro traders. One group that would be great to start with is the creators who helped make the NFT ecosystem what it is today.

How To Check Whether A Number Is A Harshad Number Or Not In Java?

Harshad number can be defined as a number which is divisible by the sum of its digits. Simply it means if the sum of the digits of the number is a factor of that number then it is a Harshad number.

In this article we will see how to check Harshad numbers by using the Java programming language.

To show you some instances Instance-1

Input number is 18

Let’s check it by using the logic of Harshad number −

Sum of the digits of the number = 1 + 8 = 9.

So, 18 is divisible by 9.

Hence, 18 is a Harshad number.

Instance-2

Input number is 3

Let’s check it by using the logic of Harshad number −

Sum of the digits of the number = 3.

So, 3 is divisible by 3.

Hence, 3 is a Harshad number.

Instance-3

Input number is 15

Let’s check it by using the logic of Harshad number −

Sum of the digits of the number = 1 + 5 = 6.

So, 15 is not divisible by 6.

Hence, 14 is not a Harshad number.

Some other examples of Harshad numbers include 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 18, 20 etc.

Syntax

To convert integer value to String value by using inbuilt toString() method.

Following is the Syntax to get total number of digits in a number by converting the integer value to String value and then finding its length and assigning the length to an integer variable −

String str = Integer.toString(input_number);

To get the length of the Integer, we will use the Java String class inbuilt length() method which returns the length of the String object.

int length = st.length();

To get the character at a specific position/index in a string we use the charAt() method. Where charAt(i)-‘0’ returns the actual integer value.

int num = st.charAt(i)-‘0’;

Where ‘st’ refers to the string ‘i’ is the iterator variable to iterate the string.

Algorithm Algorithm 1

Step 1 − Get an integer number either by initialization or by user input.

Step 2 − By iterating each digit of the number, find the sum of each digit of the number.

Step 3 − Then check if the original number is divisible by the sum of all digits of the number. If divisible then the given number is a Harshad number else it is not a Harshad number

Algorithm 2

Step 1 − Get an integer number either by initialization or by user input.

Step 2 − Convert that integer to String by using inbuilt toString() method.

Step 3 − Find the length of the String by using the inbuilt length() method.

Step 4 − Then by using a for loop, iterate till the length of the String and get one by one integer value from String by using charAt(i)-‘0’ and keep a track on the sum of all digits.

Step 5 − Then check if the original number is divisible by the sum of all digits of the number. If divisible then the given number is a Harshad number else it is not a Harshad number.

Multiple Approaches

We have provided the solution in different approaches

Without Using String

By Using String

Let’s see the program along with its output one by one.

Approach-1: Without Using String

In this approach, an integer value will be initialized in the program and then by using the Algorithm-1 we can check whether a number is a Harshad number or not.

Example

public

static

void

main

(

String

args

[

]

)

{

int

originalNumber

=

21

;

System

.

out

.

println

(

“Given number: “

+

originalNumber

)

;

int

copyOfOriginalNumber

=

originalNumber

;

int

sum

=

0

;

int

rem

=

originalNumber

%

10

;

sum

=

sum

+

rem

;

originalNumber

=

originalNumber

/

10

;

}

if

(

copyOfOriginalNumber

%

sum

==

0

)

System

.

out

.

println

(

copyOfOriginalNumber

+

” is a Harshadnumber”

)

;

else

System

.

out

.

println

(

copyOfOriginalNumber

+

” is not a Harshadnumber”

)

;

}

}

Output Given number: 21 21 is a Harshad number Approach-2: By Using String

In this approach, an integer value will be initialized in the program and then by using the Algorithm-2 we will check if the number is a Harshad number or not.

Example

public

static

void

main

(

String

args

[

]

)

{

int

originalNumber

=

40

;

System

.

out

.

println

(

“Given number: “

+

originalNumber

)

;

int

copyOfOriginalNumber

=

originalNumber

;

int

sum

=

0

;

String

str

=

Integer

.

toString

(

originalNumber

)

;

int

length

=

str

.

length

(

)

;

for

(

int

i

=

0

;

i

<

length

;

i

++

)

{

sum

+=

str

.

charAt

(

i

)

‘0’

;

}

if

(

copyOfOriginalNumber

%

sum

==

0

)

System

.

out

.

println

(

copyOfOriginalNumber

+

” is a Harshad number”

)

;

else

System

.

out

.

println

(

copyOfOriginalNumber

+

” is not a Harshad number”

)

;

}

}

Output Given number: 40 40 is a Harshad number

In this article, we explored how to check a number whether it is a Harshad number or not in Java by using different approaches.

The Best Free Backup Software And Services: Where Is It Safe To Skimp?

But wait, you say: I have free online storage through Apple’s iCloud or Google Drive, or Microsoft OneDrive. Then there are services like Dropbox, with 2GB for free.

The issue with all those services is that they’re not necessarily true backup, but syncing. That is, when you delete a file from any device or online, it’s deleted from every device. Lord help you if you make a mistake and don’t realize it in time. True backup means retaining data indefinitely no matter what’s happening with the data elsewhere.

Updated 11/30/2024: To included Perfect Backup as our new pick for best free Windows backup. Read our review below for more info on our new pick.

Free Download

1. Backupper 6 Standard – Best free backup software

Pros

Top-notch, easy interface

File backup and sync, plus imaging in one program

Free version that covers the basics

Cons

Imaging wasn’t bulletproof on all our test machines

Doesn’t back up to online repositories

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Among the free programs we’ve tested, Aomei Backupper Standard wins primarily because it has the most features, including imaging, file backup, disk cloning, and plain file syncing, plus multiple scheduling options. In addition to that, the layout and workflow are intuitive and easy enough for even a backup newb to understand. 

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2. iDrive Online Cloud Backup – Best free online backup

Pros

Online and local backup in the same job

Supports multiple PCs and devices on the same account

Cons

One of the pricier services, beyond the free version, though justifiably so

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There’s no more complete online backup storage service than iDrive. The free “basic” plan with 5GB of storage retains the features of the pay plans. 

The iDrive service comes with backup clients for nearly every PC and device, including Windows Phone—a rarity these days. The company provides additional storage for syncing all your devices and PCs, allows sharing of files with anyone, and has the ability to back up to a local drive. The company also has several affordable pay plans.

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3. Perfect Backup – Best free Windows backup

Pros

Familiar and easy interface

Friendlier data selection than Windows File History

Backs up to local media, network locations, and online services

Logging, notifications, FTP support, and lots of other options

Cons

No image backups

Must be loaded for scheduled backups

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Perfect Backup is the easiest-to-use backup software for Windows bar none, and even better, it’s free. Not only is it more stable to use than many other backup programs, but it’s probably easier to use as well. It may lack image backups for disaster recovery, but that’s not necessarily uncommon for a free service. The features it does provide, such as the options to back up to local media, the company’s online service, or other network locations, make it one of the best services regardless. If you’re looking for an easy and free way to securely store your important data in Windows then Perfect Backup is a sure bet.

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4. Windows File History – Best free Windows backup runner-up

Pros

Excellent continuous data protection with versioning

Easy, timeline browsing of backed-up files

Integrated into Windows

Backs up user-created libraries

Cons

Easy “Add folder” function removed from Windows 11

Windows File History is one of the easiest and cheapest (free) continuous data protection software for Windows. It makes backing up your data a no-brainer with its set-it-and-forget-it way of storing data and keeping automated backups.

While Microsoft has made some dubious decisions recently in regards to updates of the File History software, it still remains one of the best around. It was only narrowly edged out of our number one pick for best free Windows backup because Perfect Backup has slightly easier to use data selection tools.

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Backup software: We run each program through the various types of backups it’s capable of. This is largely to test reliability and hardware compatibility, but we time two: an approximately 115GB system image (two partitions), and a roughly 50GB image created from a set of smaller files and folders. We then mount the images and test their integrity via the program’s restore functions. We also test the USB boot drives created by the programs.

Online services: The performance of online backup services will vary according to their location and the network equipment between you and the data depository. We installed the software and backed up the same 2GB data set to check for any major issues or glitches in the client software. These are noted in the reviews.

What to look for in free backup products Online storage and backup services

Capacity: Obviously, you’ll need as much storage as you have data, plus a little, or possibly a lot, more if you want to track changes and save previous versions of files. Some services keep multiple versions of files, some don’t. In many cases there’s a time limit.

Features: In addition to backup, you may want to share your files with others, work with them from mobile devices, or even edit them with office applications such as those available with Dropbox, Google, and OneDrive. If you do intend to work online, we recommend that you maintain a local copy as backup, and a hedge against internet downtime. 

OS and device support: Most services provide client backup software for the major operating systems (Linux, OS X, and Windows) and both Android and iOS. Make sure the service you sign up for supports all of your platforms. Note: iDrive even supports Windows Phone.

Privacy: If you’re concerned about the privacy of your data, make sure you use a service that allows the use of a personal encryption key that you define. Do NOT lose it, as it is absolutely required to restore your data. Sadly, using your own key often limits the types of services (e.g., no mobile backup) available.

If private encryption keys aren’t available, read the privacy policy, especially with the free services—there are significant differences.

Reliability: Generally speaking, data centers are backed up to the hilt. Some of the larger ones even back up to different geographical locations. Availability (hopefully 24/7) can also be important. Check for news of outages and the vendor’s own service blogs. If there are too many outages in service, buy accordingly. In truth, all the services we’re aware of are near-100-percent reliable.

Speed: Speed, in many cases, is far more dependent upon your broadband connection than that of the online service, though the geographical location of the storage and the equipment in between can make a significant difference. Check the location of the data servers if speed is important to you. Or, just give the trial a whirl and see if you can live with it.

Backup software

As with most things, don’t over-buy backup software. Features you don’t need add complexity and may slow down your system. Additionally, if you intend to back up to a newly purchased external hard drive, check out the software that ships with it. Seagate, WD, and others provide backup utilities that are adequate for the average user. 

And of course, while we describe the features to look for, you’re going to find fewer of them in free software. That’s life in the cheap lane.

File backup: If you want to back up only your data (operating systems and programs can be reinstalled, though it’s mildly time- and effort-consuming), a program that backs up just the files you select is a major time-saver. Some programs automatically select the appropriate files if you use the Windows library folders (Documents, Photos, Videos, etc.).

Image backup/Imaging: Images are byte-for-byte snapshots of your entire hard drive (normally without the empty sectors) or partition, and can be used to restore both the operating system and data. Imaging is the most convenient to restore in case of a system crash, and also ensures you don’t miss anything important.

Boot media:  Should your system crash completely, you need an alternate way to boot and run the recovery software. Any backup program should be able to create a bootable optical disc or USB thumb drive. Some will also create a restore partition on your hard drive, which can be used instead if the hard drive is still operational.

Scheduling: If you’re going to back up effectively, you need to do it on a regular basis. Any backup program worth its salt allows you to schedule backups.

Versioning: If you’re overwriting previous files, that’s not backup, it’s one-way syncing or mirroring. Any backup program you use should allow you to retain several previous backups, or with file backup, previous versions of the file. The better software will retain and cull older backups according to criteria you establish.

Optical support: Every backup program supports hard drives, but as obsolete as they may seem, DVDs and Blu-ray discs are great archive media.

Online support: An offsite copy of your data is a hedge against physical disasters such as flood, fire, and power surges. Online storage services are a great way to maintain an offsite copy of your data. Backup to Dropbox and the like is a nice feature to have.

FTP and SMB/AFP: Backing up to other computers or NAS boxes on your network or in remote locations (say, your parent’s house) is another way of physically safeguarding your data with an offsite, or at least physically discrete copy. FTP can be used for offsite, while SMB (Windows and most OS’s) and AFP (Apple) are good for other PCs or NAS on your local network.

Real time: Real-time backup means that files are backed up whenever they change, usually upon creation or save. It’s also called mirroring and is handy for keeping an immediately available copy of rapidly changing data sets. For less volatile data sets, the payoff doesn’t compensate for the drain on system resources. Instead, scheduling should be used.

Continuous backup: In this case, ‘continuous’ simply means backing up on a tight schedule, generally every 5 to 15 minutes, instead of every day or weekly. Use continuous backup for rapidly changing data sets where transfer rates are too slow, or computing power is too precious for real-time backup.

Performance: Most backups proceed in the background or during dead time, so performance isn’t a huge issue in the consumer space. However, if you’re backing up multiple machines or to multiple destinations, or dealing with very large data sets, speed is a consideration.

Any backup is better than no backup

Free or paid, we highly recommend that you back up at least your essential data  against theft, malware or ransomware, and natural disasters, not to mention user error. Even if you work online, a local backup is a lot quicker to restore. And this goes beyond PCs: We get a lot of emails asking how to get data back from a stolen phone—the users generally don’t like the answer. 

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